New 401(k) Funding Limit for 2013

Good news for those looking to increase the amount they can fund into their qualified retirement plans in 2013.

For 2013, the elective deferral (contribution) limit for employees who participate in 401(k), 403(b) most 457 plans and the federal government’s Thrift Savings Plan is increased from $17,000 to $17,500.

The annual limit on the amount you can contribute to an IRA has also increased to $5,500 from $5,000.

In addition to these increases, the IRS has also announced the following limits for 2013.

  • The deduction for taxpayers making contributions to a traditional IRA is phased out for singles and heads of household who are covered by a workplace retirement plan and have modified adjusted gross incomes between $59,000 and $69,000, up from $58,000 and $68,000 in 2012. For married couples filing jointly in which the spouse who makes the IRA contribution is covered by a workplace retirement plan, the income phase-out range is $95,000 to $115,000, up from $92,000 to $112,000. For an IRA contributor who is not covered by a workplace retirement plan and is married to someone who is covered, the deduction is phased out if the couple’s income is between $178,000 and $188,000, up from $173,000 and $183,000.
  • The Adjusted Gross Income (“AGI”) phase-out range for taxpayers making contributions to a Roth IRA is $178,000 to $188,000 for married couples filing jointly, up from $173,000 to $183,000 in 2012. For singles and heads of household, the income phase-out range is $112,000 to $127,000, up from $110,000 to $125,000. For a married individual filing a separate return who is covered by a retirement plan at work, the phase-out range remains $0 to $10,000.
  • The AGI limit for the saver’s credit (also known as the retirement savings contribution credit) for low- and moderate-income workers is $59,000 for married couples filing jointly, up from $57,500 in 2012; $44,250 for heads of household, up from $43,125; and $29,500 for married individuals filing separately and for singles, up from $28,750.
If you have questions regarding these new limits or how to maximize your retirement plan funding, please do not hesitate to contact us.
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